2020 Stocks

SCNCY

Well-Known Member
Sep 11, 2009
5,124
2,702
113
34
La Fox, IL
I purchased about $4000 today in my IRA accounts. I purchased MSFT and VZ to help balance out my portfolio (I was way short on tech and telecommunication stocks). The main investment strategy was for dividend-paying stocks.

I still have about 4500 more to buy, but I'm going to wait on the rest to see how it plays out. If the market begins to stabilize, then I'll miss out on a little gain.
 
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NWICY

Well-Known Member
Sep 2, 2012
16,240
11,156
113
I'm not sure if you are being serious or sarcastic but I'm sorry if I'm not just filthy rich like some seem to be apparently... Our mtg is our only debt right now and haven't had a car payment in years. Our cars are a 2007 Impala and 2015 Traverse so no we aren't driving cars we can't afford either and not in the market to replace one for at least 2-3 more years maybe. There is no way I could write a check for 100k today and pay the whole thing off without depleting all our savings and investments as well as probably dipping into retirement funds too. Definitely not into more house than we can afford, if anything we probably could easily qualify for much more house than we currently own but we don't have the want nor need for it. We also have 2 kids, 1 still in daycare (used to have both in daycare just a year ago) and we've made a priority to contribute to their 529 college savings plans since they day their were born. We don't live high on the hog with stuff in our house either, very moderate and inexpensive furnishings and we definitely don't buy the latest and greatest technology as the newest TV in the house is 6 years old while our main TV is probably over 10 years old now as I can't even remember what year we bought it. No iPads, Alexa or any stuff like that and last time we upgraded cell phones was about 2.5 years ago too.

Thanks for passing judgement before you knew the situation... I'd call being 40 years old and only having a single 100k debt when others have student loans, car loans, possible CC debt, etc all on their plate I'm be thrilled to be in a situation to have our house paid off before our kids start college. I owned a home for 10 years that I bought 1 year out of college before we bought the house we are in now and brought over about 50k of equity from that house so we didn't have to take out a larger loan. I feel very grateful and blessed that I'm in the financial situation as I am in now because I know people in a helluva lot more debt than us that probably are stretched thin paycheck to paycheck.



Thank you, would love to get that paid down faster. We're 6 years in at 4.3% on a 30 year right now so it obviously makes since to take advantage of the rates right now and go down to 15 year which really isn't going to change our monthly payment much and help us pay that off much faster.

Pretty sure Gunner was being sarcastic. There have been multiple threads about having to pay cash for cars and then that got extrapolated out into mortgages.
 
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BCClone

Well-Known Member
Sep 4, 2011
38,507
30,723
113
North Iowa
I am actually seeing that number in a lot of areas. I think it is very possible but looks like a very good target. A chart of DIA ETF shows the 3rd Fibonacci retracement (61.8%) is 200.41 or so.
Why you do it at 20,250. It never quite gets to that nice round number, and if it does, you aren't very far off it.
 
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ArgentCy

Well-Known Member
Jan 13, 2010
20,385
11,172
113
Why you do it at 20,250. It never quite gets to that nice round number, and if it does, you aren't very far off it.

No I agree. The market likes to target those round numbers but lots of people do the same so it usually never reaches.
 

ArgentCy

Well-Known Member
Jan 13, 2010
20,385
11,172
113
Anyone ballsy enough to buy any of these oil stocks? At what levels?

Not yet. You need to look at balance sheets because the overleveraged will not survive. One you might look at is EPD, one of the best midstream operators but they do have a good amount of debt.
 

cyclone4L

Well-Known Member
Jun 30, 2013
3,500
6,691
113
I get a bit worrisome when people I know talk about stocks. Please don't get me wrong, I am not saying some of you don't know what you are doing, but I fear that some may make dumb decisions.

Story time:

I have a friend who has founded a few large companies and is very connected in silicon valley. In the 90's, he knew the dot-com bubble was going to burst and he wanted to capitalize on it. He found a company he believed was VASTLY inflated by the bubble and decided 'I'm going to short $1 million in this stock" and he picked a few others as well (shorting smaller amounts). The other companies did tank; the company he shorted $1 million was Amazon. He owed more than 5 million dollars when it was all over. Even a highly-connected, super smart dude lost millions.

So, please please please understand one thing about the stock market: only put in what you can afford to lose.

Everything else like "Diversify your portfolio" and other catchphrases are dumb. Diversifying your portfolio for only the sake of diversifying is idiotic; that phrase means pick stocks you think will hit big, but don't put all your eggs in one basket. It doesn't mean get some energy, some AG, some tech, some financial. NO, that's what brokers and financial advisors tell you so they can sell you their GARBAGE. and I mean GARBAGE. Even when you're losing money, they're making money.

I kinda rambled there, but what I'm trying to say is DON'T BE A "KNOW IT ALL". I definitely don't know it all, if I know anything at all.

I wish everyone the best of luck.

And I put a bunch in BP yesterday. Lowest it's been since 1995? Sign me up.
 

BCClone

Well-Known Member
Sep 4, 2011
38,507
30,723
113
North Iowa
I get a bit worrisome when people I know talk about stocks. Please don't get me wrong, I am not saying some of you don't know what you are doing, but I fear that some may make dumb decisions.

Story time:

I have a friend who has founded a few large companies and is very connected in silicon valley. In the 90's, he knew the dot-com bubble was going to burst and he wanted to capitalize on it. He found a company he believed was VASTLY inflated by the bubble and decided 'I'm going to short $1 million in this stock" and he picked a few others as well (shorting smaller amounts). The other companies did tank; the company he shorted $1 million was Amazon. He owed more than 5 million dollars when it was all over. Even a highly-connected, super smart dude lost millions.

So, please please please understand one thing about the stock market: only put in what you can afford to lose.

Everything else like "Diversify your portfolio" and other catchphrases are dumb. Diversifying your portfolio for only the sake of diversifying is idiotic; that phrase means pick stocks you think will hit big, but don't put all your eggs in one basket. It doesn't mean get some energy, some AG, some tech, some financial. NO, that's what brokers and financial advisors tell you so they can sell you their GARBAGE. and I mean GARBAGE. Even when you're losing money, they're making money.

I kinda rambled there, but what I'm trying to say is DON'T BE A "KNOW IT ALL". I definitely don't know it all, if I know anything at all.

I wish everyone the best of luck.

And I put a bunch in BP yesterday. Lowest it's been since 1995? Sign me up.

So we should look at BP or listen to the first part where you say not to listen to people?
 

CascadeClone

Well-Known Member
Oct 24, 2009
4,190
3,380
113
I am putting some more in my preferred small cap value fund today. Russell is still falling today, down 20% from peak as of yesterday. Not really trying to time the bottom exactly, just feel like it has gone down a ton and it's a decent spot to buy back. Plus this part of my portfolio is a little underweight from where I want it, and it will be 5-10 years before I need this money anyway.

I feel like I am a good long term investor (diversified, patient, etc), but once I hit like 55, I am gonna have to figure out a whole new process lol.
 

cyfan92

Well-Known Member
Sep 20, 2011
3,560
5,082
113
Augusta National Golf Club
Anyone ballsy enough to buy any of these oil stocks? At what levels?

I worry about these stocks rebounding due to ESG investing being on the rise.. I'm avoiding energy companies until I read up more on it. Also it is one of the most highly leveraged industries. Not the greatest time to take on that much leverage and record low forecasted pricing and lowering demand
 
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kchacker

Well-Known Member
Mar 1, 2012
1,643
1,419
113
Phoenix
I feel like I am a good long term investor (diversified, patient, etc), but once I hit like 55, I am gonna have to figure out a whole new process lol.

My parents are very near retirement age and they re-arranged nearly everything a couple of years ago, getting much more conservative. While this stuff sucks for me, I'm hoping my parents can ride this out, get some of their money back in after things have bottomed out, and enjoy what they have afterward.

They got lucky due to their situation, if they were a few years younger things would be much different for them, to the point where they might have had to continue working for years longer than they planned. I feel for people in that position.
 

capitalcityguy

Well-Known Member
Jun 14, 2007
8,325
2,109
113
Des Moines
This is what I try to get through to people when I get pushback about “timing the market”.

Agreed. Yeah….staying in the market but also at the same time buying more when it dips is hardly what most experts warn about when they caution against trying to “time the market”.

I haven’t read the entire thread. Are people really suggesting otherwise???
 

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